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Environment, Biodiversity and Agricultural Change in West Africa
• Perspectives from Ghana •


Table of contents (157 p.)


Edited by Edwin A. Gyasi and Juha I. Uitto

United Nations
University Press
TOKYO - NEW YORK - PARIS

The United Nations University, 1997
The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations University.

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Contents


Preface
Acknowledgements
Opening address
The context

1: General background

Ecological setting
Farming systems
Problem
References

2: People, land management and environmental change: Conceptual background, with focus on Africa

Background and context
Population, agriculture and environment in sub-Saharan Africa
Objectives of PLEC
PLEC in Africa
International collaboration for sustainable development
References

3: Indigenous African farming systems: Their significance for sustainable environmental use (Keynote address)

Concept of sustainability
Indigenous sustainable farming systems
Conclusion
References

4: Criteria for designing sustainable farming systems in tropical Africa

Sustainable agriculture
Farming systems of tropical Africa and their sustainability under changing conditions
Ingredients of sustainable farming systems and issues to be considered in the design of these systems
Sectorial interface requirements
Conclusions and recommendations
References

Pilot study of production pressure and environmental change in the forest-savanna zone of southern Ghana

5: Background and objectives of the study of production pressure and environmental change in the southern forest-savanna transition zone

Objectives
Hypotheses
The forest-savanna zone
References

6: A multidisciplinary integrated methodology

Field study
Conclusion
References

7: Land use and cover patterns

Methodology
Results
Summary
References

8: Soils

Materials and method
Analyses
Results and discussion
Conclusion
References

9: Floral and faunal diversity

Materials and methods
Results and other observations
Other observations
Discussion
Conclusion
References

10: Population growth and urban demand

Population growth
Urban demand
Conclusion
References

11: Ability of the farming systems to cope and strategies for sustaining farming

The agroenvironmental changes and adaptations
Declining yields
Strategies for sustaining farming
Conclusion
References

12: Gender and non-governmental organizations in environmental management

Gender and non-governmental organizations
Environmental and agricultural changes
Measures for coping with the adverse changes
The relative roles of NGOs and GOs
Conclusion

Related studies

13: Interacting with the environment: Adaptation and regeneration on degraded land in upper Manya Krobo

Upper Manya Krobo
Research methodology
Land degradation and its consequences
Adaptation, regeneration and innovation
Implications for research
Acknowledgement
References

14: Land use and cover change in the southern forest-savanna transition zone in Ghana: A sequence model

Introduction
Study area
Conceptual basis
Studies
Land use and cover sequences
Food cropping on abandoned land
Land use and cover sub-sequences
General indications and future trends
References

15: Women, environmental change and economic crisis in Ghana

Introduction
Background to the research: Economic crisis and structural adjustment
Environmental degradation in North-Eastern Ghana
Gender and agricultural systems in North-Eastern Ghana
The gender division of labour
Structural adjustment and its impact on health, nutrition and consumption patterns
Changes in educational status
Changes in income-generating activities
Changes in women's time use
Women's time use and seasonality
Conclusion
References

Conclusions

16: Conclusions and directions for future research

Research objectives
Methodology
Research extension
Other recommendations

Contributors


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