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Positive Deviance in Child Nutrition - with emphasis on Psychosocial and Behavioural Aspects and Implications for Development


Table of contents (163 p.)


By MARIAN ZEITLIN, HOSSEIN GHASSEMI, and MOHAMED MANSOUR

The United Nations University is an organ of the United Nations established by the General Assembly in 1972 to be an international community of scholars engaged in research, advanced training, and the dissemination of knowledge related to the pressing global problems of human survival, development, and welfare. Its activities focus mainly on peace and conflict resolution, development in a changing world, and science and technology in relation to human welfare. The University operates through a worldwide network of research and post-graduate training centres, with its planning and co-ordinating headquarters in Tokyo, Japan.

Positive Deviance in Child Nutrition - With Emphasis on Psychosocial and Behavioural Aspects and Implications for Development

With the collaboration of Robert A. LeVine, Maria Dillanueva, Manuel Carballo, and Suganya Sockalingam

Published with the support of the WHO/UNICEF Joint Nutrition Support Programme financed by the Government of Italy

Food and Nutrition Bulletin Supplement 14

Complementary to the UNU-UNICEF Research on the Evaluation of Programmes of Nutrition and Primary Health Care at the Household Level, the research summarized in this volume was commissioned by the WHO-UNICEF Joint Nutrition Support Programmes financed by the Government of Italy. It examines the performance of mothers who were successful in maintaining their children's and family's nutrition and health under conditions of poverty in which most were failing to do so.

The major objectives of this study of positive deviance were to identify successful child-care and feeding behaviours and to determine effective aspects of social support systems as a basis for designing policies and programmes to reinforce and extend these adaptations to more mothers.

The United Nations University, 1990

The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations University.

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03000P


Contents


Acknowledgements

Executive summary

The literature and its policy and programme implications

Introduction
Rationale for studying positive deviance
Conceptual approaches
Overview of findings from the literature
Overall conclusions and policy recommendations
Introduction to the detailed review of behavioural, psychological, and social correlates of child growth
Maternal/caretaker-child interactions
Child characteristics
Maternal characteristics
Socio-cultural support

Research considerations

Introduction and purpose
Underlying assumptions or hypotheses for research in positive deviance
Relationship of positive-deviance research to epidemiological methods
Definition of terms and specification of research goals
Three-stage research and pilot-project model
Research design for stage 1
A conceptual framework for the design of positive-deviance studies
Important variables: results of the positive-deviance mail survey
Micro-level variables measuring caretaker-child interactions
Variables measuring maternal characteristics and socio-cultural support
Measuring growth
Controlling for socio-economic status
Limiting the number of covariables: restriction by age and topic
Rationale for existing behaviours and social structures
Timeline for change
Nutrition and infection
Management of multidisciplinary teams

References

Appendices

Table A. Countries included in regional groupings
Table B. Survey of expert knowledge and opinion on positive deviance in nutrition of young children: rural areas only
Table C. Survey of expert knowledge and opinion on positive deviance in nutrition of young children: urban areas only
Table D. Survey of expert knowledge and opinion on positive deviance in nutrition of young children: overall
Table E. Survey of expert knowledge and opinion on positive deviance in nutrition of young children: opinion scores by setting mean (SD)
Table F. Survey of expert knowledge and opinion on positive deviance in nutrition of young children: opinion scores by region, mean (SD)
Table G. Summary of observations, suggestions, and comments from the questionnaire
Names and Addresses of Positive-deviance Mail-survey Respondents


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