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Food Composition Data: A User's Perspective


Table of contents (236 p.)


Edited by
William M. Rand, Carol T. Windham,
Bonita W. Wyse, and Vernon R. Young

Report of a conference held in Logan, Utah, USA, 26-29 March 1985

The United Nations University

Food and Nutrition Bulletin Supplement 12

Supported in part by the United States National Institutes of Health,
Contract No. N01-CN-45168

The United Nations University, 1987

The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations University.

United Nations University Press
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United Nations Sales No. E.87.III.A.2
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Contents


Acknowledgments

Foreword

Preface

Executive summary

Report and recommendations of the conference

Introduction
The users and their needs
Food composition data
A food composition data system
Recommendations
References

Experiences with food composition data: the context

INFOODS: Background and current status

Introduction
Growing need for and availability of information on components of foods
Generation and recording of food component data
INFOODS - an international network of food data systems: a framework for discussion
Summary and conclusions
References

Data: the user context

Introduction
The link between the user and the data
The variability of the data

The INFOODS system

Introduction
Data interchange and regional centres
Regional decisions
Local decisions

The uses of food composition data

Need for a standardized nutrient data base in epidemiologic studies

Introduction
Limitations of diet-related epidemiologic studies
Factors influencing diet-related epidemiologic studies, using diet and colon cancer studies as an illustration
Some potential problems with incomplete and non-standardized nutrient data bases
Summary
References

Epidemiological uses of food composition data in the European context

Introduction
Nutritional epidemiology
The problems
Suggestions for improvement
Ongoing activities
Summary
References

NCI food data needs: impact on coding systems

Introduction
International research
United States studies
Local research
Individual level
Uses of food composition data
Implications for infoods
Summary

Food composition -a key to dietary appraisal and improvement in the United States

Introduction
Food composition data needs
National nutrition monitoring system
Nutrition education
Discussion
Approaches to meeting data needs
References

Using food composition data to communicate nutrition to the consumer

Introduction
NUTREDFO system development
Nutrient and food constituent data sources
Food composition data characteristics and limitations
Interrelationships of nutrition education and food composition data
Using NUTREDFO for nutrition guidance research
Comments on selected nutrients in NUTREDFO
Recommendations
Acknowledgements
References

Nutrient composition data uses and needs of food companies

Introduction
Available food composition data
Uses of food composition data
Needs and concerns
Summary
References

Managing food composition data

Concerns of users of nutrient data bases

Introduction
Accessibility
Installation and updating efforts
Data availability
Computational concerns
Data-base and software products
References

Managing food composition data at the national level

Introduction
Data input
Data output
Special considerations
Conclusions
References

Maintaining a food composition data base for multiple research studies: the NCC food table

Introduction
Specific user needs and approaches to these needs
Minimizing redundancy in the nutrient data base
Summary
References

Managing a nutrient data-base system: meeting users' needs and expectations

Introduction
The HVH-CWRU nutrient data-base system
Uses and users
Meeting users' needs and expectations
Conclusions
References

International food composition data

Nutrient intake data calculated using food composition tables: factors affecting accuracy

Introduction
Materials and methods
Results
Discussion
References

The status of food composition data in Asia

Introduction
Food availability
Generation of food composition data
Users and uses of food composition data
Unmet needs
The future of ASIAFOODS
Acknowledgements
References

Food composition data in Sweden and the nordic countries

Swedish food composition tables
Swedish national nutrient data bases
Other Swedish data bases
Food composition tables in other nordic countries
Nutrient data banks in the other nordic countries
References

Food data in Canada: the Canadian nutrient file

Introduction
Methods
Discussion
References

Other considerations

A system for evaluating the quality of published nutrient data: Selenium, a test case

Introduction
Background
Procedure
Criteria
Calculation of the mean SE value and confidence code
Results
Discussion
Implications
Acknowledgements
Disclaimer
References

Consideration of food composition variability: What is the variance of the estimate of one-day intakes? Implications for setting priorities

Introduction
Magnitude of the reported variability of composition
Impact of composition variation on a one-day food intake
Additional impact of a random error in intake estimation
Some implications for data analyses
Validation of food intake data: implications of food composition variation
Systematic errors in food composition data
Relevance to priorities for food composition data
Conclusions
References

Dietary assessment methods used by the national health and nutrition examination surveys (NHANES)

Introduction
Design of NHANES II
Major nutrition-related components of NHANES II
Uses of dietary data
Plans for future NHANES
Conclusion

Systems considerations in the design of INFOODS

Introduction
Staff turnover and system growth
Documentation
The choice of environmental and basic tools
Choices of operating systems
Choice of programming language
User interface
Data representations
System architecture and linkages
Stability
Primitive tool-based systems
Summary
References

Participants


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