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Methods for the Evaluation of the Impact of Food and Nutrition Programmes


Table of contents (299 p.)


Edited by David E. Sahn, Richard Lockwood, and Nevin S. Scrimshaw

Report of a workshop on the Evaluation of Food and Nutrition Programmes, sponsored by the United Nations University on behalf of the United Nations ACC Sub-committee on Nutrition, held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, in September 1981.

THE UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSITY

The United Nations University, 1984

The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations University.

United Nations University Press
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Second printing, 1988
Printed in Singapore

WHTR-6/UNUP-473
ISBN 92-808-0473-1
United Nations Sales No. E. 88.III.A.11
02500 P

The United Nations University is an organ of the United Nations established by the General Assembly in 1972 to be an international community of scholars engaged in research, advanced training, and the dissemination of knowledge related to the pressing global problems of human survival, development, and welfare. Its activities focus mainly on peace and conflict resolution, development in a changing world, and science and technology in relation to human welfare. The University operates through a worldwide network of research and postgraduate training centres, with its planning and co-ordinating headquarters in Tokyo, Japan.


Contents


Preface

1. Basic concepts for the design of evaluation during programme implementation

Introduction
Costs of evaluation
Purposes of evaluation
Setting programme objectives as a basis for evaluation
Investigating causality
Confounding variables and evaluation design
Levels of analysis
Definitions of population groups involved
Effect/cost
Appropriate indicators for different objectives
Note on sample size
References
Bibliography

2. Stages in the evaluation of ongoing programmes

Introduction
Stage 1: preliminary tasks
Stage 2: evaluating the plan of the programme
Stage 3: evaluating implementation
Stage 4: evaluating gross outcome
Stage 5: evaluating net outcome
Stage 6: move to a built-in evaluation
References

3. Measuring the impact of nutrition interventions on physical growth

Introduction
General considerations
Minimum anthropometric battery
Methodology
Physical growth norms
References

4. Measuring impact using laboratory methodologies

Introduction
Development of a primary nutritional deficiency
Choice of tissue for laboratory assessment
Selection of laboratory methodologies for nutritional impact evaluation
Laboratory methods for assessment of nutritional impact
Annex A. Laboratory evaluation of protein nutriture
Annex B. Laboratory evaluation of vitamin A nutriture
Annex C. Suggested methods for hematology
References

5. Measuring impact using clinical, morbidity, and mortality data

Framework for analysis
Methods of measurement
Annex A. Field nutrition assessment form
Annex B. Xerophthalmia field survey forms
Annex C. Diarrhoea/growth study illness surveillance form
Annex D. Brief examination of child
Annex E. Birth report form
Annex F. Death report form
Annex G. Maternity history questionnaire
References
Bibliography

6. Measuring impact by assessing dietary intake and food consumption

Reasons for assessing household food practices
Deciding on a method
Models for household dietary assessment
Additional data
Steps and procedures in surveying
Assessing dietary change
Summary
Annex A. Development of a score card for the rapid assessment of calorie and nutrient intakes
Annex B. Household quantitative intake record
References

7. Measuring impact using immunologic techniques

Introduction
Methodologies
Concluding remarks
References
Bibliography

8. Measuring impact on physical activity and physical fitness

Introduction
Physical activity and energy expenditure
General comments on methodology
Techniques available for measuring energy expenditure
General considerations in use of techniques
Physical fitness measurement
Conclusion
Bibliography

9. Methods for the behavioural assessment of the consequences of malnutrition

Description of methods in published studies
An information-processing approach
Annex: Behavioural test battery
References

10. Anthropological methodologies for assessing household organization and structure

Introduction
The basic household interview
Components of the basic household interview
Some general methodological issues concerning the household interview
Reference

11. Micro-economic analysis in the evaluation of supplementary feeding programmes

Introduction
The use of micro-economic analysis
Measurement issues
Summary and conclusion
Reference

12. Data recording and processing

Introduction
Data recording
Data processing
Concluding remarks
References

13. Policy evaluations

A policy evaluation methodology
Implication of evaluation methodology
Reference

14. Built-in evaluation systems for supplementary feeding programmes why and how

Introduction
The concept of a built-in evaluation system
Reasons for built-in evaluation
Characteristics of a built-in evaluation system
Implementing a built-in evaluation system
Use of the data for overall programme management
References

Participants

Other UNU titles of interest


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