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Results


Correlation analysis of the various weight-for-height indices with weight, height, triceps and subscapular fat-folds and with the sum of both, showed that the Quetelet index or BMI was the one that at each year of age, tended to have the highest correlations with weight, fat-folds and their sum, and lower correlations with height (data not shown).

The percentile values of BMI for either sex showed that the median for men was between 22.2 and 23.7 and for women between 22.4 and 25.5. More than 97% of men had BMI >18.0 and almost the same proportion of women were >17.0 (Table 1).

With the data supplied by the distribution tables of individuals by categories of fat-folds according to the BMI categories, cut-off points for BMI were selected (Table 2). The distribution of individuals in relation to the agreed figures (Tables 3 and 4) showed, for the whole group, that over 50% of men and a little over 40% of women fell into a normal BMI range. Very small percentages, especially of men, were classified as CED. In the obese classification, however, there was a considerable number of individuals (a little over 30% of the men and nearly 40% of the women). A higher percentage of urban adults of both sexes showed obese BMI values, while the rural population in general had the lower BMI categories (Table 5).

Table 1. Body mass index values in the Cuban adult population



Percentiles

Age groups (years)

n

3

10

25

50

75

90

97

Males









20-39

2907

18.0

19.2

20.5

22.2

24.6

27.2

29.7

30-39

4518

18.3

19.7

21.2

23.4

26.1

28.7

31.3

40-49

2741

18.4

19.8

21.5

23.7

26.5

29.0

31.8

50-59

1189

17.9

19.4

21.1

23.3

26.3

:28.6

31.5

Females









20-29

7447

16.9

18.2

20.0

22.4

25.6

28.9

32.9

30-39

7233

17.4

19.1

21.3

24.1

27.4

31.1

34.9

40-49

3189

17.5

19.7

22.1

25.4

28.8

32.4

36.1

50-59

839

16.8

19.3

22.3

25.5

29.7

33.3

37.1

Table 2. The 'normality' body mass index of values specified by cut-off points (COP)

Age (years) groups

Males

Females


Low COP

High COP

Low COP

High COP

20-39

21.0

25.4

20.6

26.6

40-59

21.5

26.5

22.2

28.9

Table 3. Distribution of individuals by body mass index (BMI): males



CED 3 BMI <16

CED 2 BMI 16-16.9

CED 1 BMI 17-18.4

Underweight BMI 18.5-19.9

Normal BMI 20-24.9

Obese 1-2-3 BMI 25

Age groups (years)

n

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

20-29

2907

3

0.1

19

0.7

132

4.5

386

13.3

1740

59.9

627

21.6

30-39

4518

9

0.2

22

0.5

150

3.3

396

8.8

2428

53.7

1513

33.5

40-49

2741

4

0.1

19

0.7

75

2.7

211

7.7

1396

50.9

1036

37.8

50-59

1189

2

0.2

10

0.8

46

3.9

123

10.3

602

50.6

406

34.1

20-59

11355

18

0.2

70

0.6

403

3.6

1116

9.8

6166

54.3

3582

31.5

Table 4. Distribution of individuals by body mass index (BMI): females

Age groups (years)


CED 3 BMI <16

CED 2 BMI I6-16.9

CED 1 BMI 17-18.4

Underweight BMI 18.5-19.9

Normal BMI 20-24.9

Obese 1-2-3 BMI 25


n

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

20-29

7447

62

0.8

185

2.5

680

9.1

962

12.9

3444

46.2

2114

28.4

30-39

7233

46

0.6

101

1.4

377

5.2

642

8.9

2963

41.0

3104

42.9

40-49

3189

34

1.1

27

0.8

119

3.7

200

6.3

1106

34.7

1703

53.4

50-59

839

11

1.3

16

1.9

33

3.9

53

6.3

280

33.4

446

53.2

20-59

18708

153

0.8

329

1.8

1209

6.5

1857

9.9

7793

41.7

7367

39.4

Table 5. Distribution of individuals by body mass index (BMI) and place of residence

Age group: 20-59 years


CED 3 BMI <16

CED 2 BMI 16-16.9

CED 1 BM I17-18.4

Underweight BMI 18.5-19.9

Normal BMI 20-24.9

Obese 1-2-3 BMI 25


n

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

Males














Urban

7565

13

0.2

50

0.7

257

3.4

677

8.9

3841

50.8

2727

36.0

Rural

3786

5

0.1

20

0.5

146

3.9

438

11.6

2323

61.4

854

22.6

Females














Urban

12974

89

0.7

188

1.5

712

5.5

1198

9.2

5363

41.3

5424

41.8

Rural

5727

64

1.1

141

2.5

497

8.7

657

11.5

2425

42.3

1943

33.9

In men, there was no relation between educational level and percentages of CED 1, 2, 3, nor in those classified as underweight. In the normal BMI category the percentages of men were inversely proportional to their educational level. In the obese classification, the values followed the same trend as the educational level (Table 6). In women, percentages for CED classification as well as for underweight followed an inverse trend with the educational level. In the normal BMI range there were higher percentages in the higher educational groups but obesity had no relation to the educational level (Table 7).

As for occupation, the percentages of men classified as CED or underweight were slightly higher in those who did light physical work. Obesity was much more prevalent in the office worker than in the farm workers (Table 8). The highest proportions of underweight and CED women were found in agricultural workers and housewives. There was no relation between the physical effort required by the occupation and the percentages of individuals in the normal BMI and obese groups (Table 9).

The shortest men tended to have BMIs shifted to the right (higher) compared with tallest men. There was a similar shift in the shortest compared with the tallest women (Tables 10 and 11).

Table 6. Distribution of individuals by body mass index (BMI) and educational level in men aged 20-59 years

Educational levela


CED 3 BMI<16

CED 2 BMI 216-16.9

CED 1 BMI 17-18.4

Underweight BMI 18.5-19.9

Normal BMI 20-24.9

Obese 1-2-3 BMI 25


n

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

n

%

1

1623

2

0.1

15

0.9

60

3.7

123

7.6

785

46.7

663

41.0

2

2728

5

0.2

12

0.4

92

3.4

273

10.0

1395

51.1

951

34.9

3

4643

7

0.2

24

0.5

159

3.4

440

9.5

2623

56.5

1390

29.9

4

2280

4

0.2

18

0.8

88

3.9

271

11.9

1345

59.0

554

24.3

aGroups:
1, high school graduates, university graduates
2, junior high school graduates
3, junior high school not completed, elementary school graduates
4, elementary school not completed.

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